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Soyuz rocket failure: Booster separation was to blame for botched launch, Russia says

Russia says that a problem with the separation of first and second stage booster rockets was to blame for Thursday’s failed Soyuz launch.

However, Thursday's incident was the first manned failure for Russia since September 1983, when an earlier version of Soyuz exploded on the launch pad. A year earlier, a rocket carrying three communications satellites fell into the Pacific Ocean.

6 Other Related Articles

BBC -
Russia probes dramatic aborted Soyuz flight

Thursday's incident is thought to be the first launch mishap for a Russian Soyuz booster since a Soyuz mission was aborted in 1983.

Russian officials are investigating the cause of a booster problem that forced a Soyuz rocket capsule to make an emergency landing just after launch. The two crew members, Russian cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin and American astronaut Nick Hague, are in good health, officials say.


Global News -
Astronauts aboard ISS stuck in space ‘indefinitely’ after Russian rocket failure: Chris Hadfield

Canadian astronaut’s mission to ISS in question after Russia’s rocket failure. They were on their way to the ISS, but according to former Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield, it may take months to fix the rocket, meaning the crew members aboard the space station may be stuck there “indefinitely.”

Three astronauts living on the International Space Station (ISS) were set to welcome two new crew members Thursday, but the Russian Soyuz spacecraft heading there had to make an emergency landing just minutes after takeoff.


Wall Street Jurnal -
Rocket Headed for International Space Station Aborts After Booster Failure

A Russian rocket carrying an American astronaut and his Russian counterpart to the international space station aborted the flight shortly after launch because of a booster failure.

The Soyuz is among the most frequently used rockets and is relied on by NASA to ferry astronauts to the orbiting space station. NASA stopped taking astronauts to the space station on its own with the retirement of the space shuttle in 2011.


Global News -
U.S., Russian astronauts make emergency landing after booster rocket fails

Two astronauts from the U.S. and Russia were safe after an emergency landing Thursday in the steppes of Kazakhstan following the failure of a Russian booster rocket carrying them to the International Space Station.

A senior Cabinet official says that Russia is suspending manned space launches pending a probe into a Russian booster rocket failure minutes after the launch. Russian Deputy Prime Minister Yuri Borisov told reporters that the Soyuz capsule automatically jettisoned from the booster when it failed 123 seconds after the launch from the Russia-leased Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.


Washington Post -
American, Russian alive after Soyuz rocket headed to space station fails on launch

A Russian rocket carrying an American and a Russian to the International Space Station failed on launch Thursday, forcing the astronaut and cosmonaut to careen back to Earth in a dramatic emergency landing.

It was the first time that the Soyuz — the main workhorse of manned space flight today — had failed on a launch to the 20-year-old International Space Station. The spacecraft has been the sole means of bringing humans to the space station since the end of the U.S. Space Shuttle program, but commercial providers aiming for manned spaceflight are increasingly nipping at Russia’s heels.


CTV -
U.S., Russian astronauts safe after emergency landing

Two astronauts from the U.S. and Russia were safe after an emergency landing Thursday in the steppes of Kazakhstan following the failure of a Russian booster rocket carrying them to the International Space Station.

NASA and Russian Roscosmos space agency said the astronauts were in good condition after their capsule landed about 20 kilometres (12 miles) east of the city of Dzhezkazgan in Kazakhstan.



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