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Michael Drenches Carolinas After Ravaging Florida Panhandle

TALLAHASSEE, Fla.—The remnants of Hurricane Michael plowed through the Southeast U.S. Thursday after killing at least two people, demolishing homes and knocking out power to hundreds of thousands of people as it tore through the Florida Panhandle and Georgia.

The storm hit the Florida coastline near Mexico Beach on Wednesday as a Category 4 hurricane, the strongest to hit the Panhandle in 167 years of record-keeping, and one of the most intense to ever make landfall in the U.S.. The storm packed 155-mile-per-hour winds when it came ashore, and pushed a wall of ocean water into the Florida coast.

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Wall Street Jurnal -
Michael to Drench Carolinas After Ravaging Florida Panhandle

TALLAHASSEE, Fla.—The remnants of Hurricane Michael began plowing into South Carolina early Thursday after killing at least two people, demolishing homes, flooding the coastline and knocking out power to hundreds of thousands of people as it tore through the Florida Panhandle and Georgia.

The storm hit the Florida coastline near Mexico Beach on Wednesday as a Category 4 hurricane, the strongest to hit the Panhandle in 167 years of record keeping, and one of the most intense to ever make landfall in the U.S.. The storm packed 155-mile-per-hour winds when it came ashore, and also pushed a wall of ocean water into the Florida coast.


Wall Street Jurnal -
Now a Tropical Storm, Michael Leaves Devastation in Florida

The storm hit the Florida coastline near Mexico Beach on Wednesday as a Category 4 hurricane, the strongest to hit the Panhandle in 167 years of record keeping, and one of the most intense to ever make landfall in the U.S.. The storm packed 155-mile-per-hour winds when it came ashore, and also pushed a wall of ocean water into the Florida coast.

TALLAHASSEE, Fla.—The remnants of Hurricane Michael began plowing into South Carolina early Thursday after killing at least two people, demolishing homes, flooding the coastline and knocking out power to hundreds of thousands of people as it tore through the Florida Panhandle and Georgia.



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