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Koch chief says health care bill insufficiently conservative

Chief lieutenants in the Koch brothers' political network lashed out at the Senate Republican health care bill on Saturday as not conservative enough, becoming a powerful outside critic as GOP leaders try to rally support for their plan among rank-and-file Republicans.

Tim Phillips, who leads Americans For Prosperity, the Koch network's political arm, called the Senate's plans for Medicaid "a slight nip and tuck" of President Barack Obama's health care law, a modest change he described as "immoral."

124 Other Related Articles

LA Times -
Rep. Maxine Waters speaks out on Republican health care bill at packed town hall meeting, as protesters gather outside

To illustrate why she believes everyone should have access to comprehensive health care, Rep. Maxine Waters said she and her 12 siblings never saw a physician or a dentist their entire childhood.

The California Democrat, who spoke Saturday at a packed town hall meeting in Gardena, said she worries some Americans will be forced to do what her family did if the Republican health care bill passes.


Washington Post -
Senate health-care bill faces serious resistance from GOP moderates

A small group of moderate Republican senators, worried that their leaders’ health-care bill could damage the nation’s social safety net, may pose at least as significant an obstacle to the measure’s passage as their colleagues on the right.

Though Senate conservatives were the first to threaten to torpedo the bill, contending that it is too generous, the potential loss of nearly half a dozen moderate lawmakers’ votes may be the main hurdle.


CBS News -
How would the Senate health care bill actually affect Medicaid?

Democrats and left-leaning think tanks say Senate Republicans' health care bill would be disastrous for individuals and families on Medicaid, the federal program that provides health coverage to low-income Americans.

White House press secretary Sean Spicer on Friday said President Trump is "committed to making sure that no one who currently is in the Medicaid program is affected in any way, which is reflected in the Senate bill, and he's pleased with that."


New York Times -
Health Law Repeal Leaves Nevada Republican Torn Between Lawmakers

Brian Sandoval, the governor of Mr. Heller’s home state, is a Republican, but he is counting on Mr. Heller to provide what could be a crucial vote to maintain President Barack Obama’s health care law, which has been a boon for small businesses in Nevada.

As early as Thursday, the Senate will take a momentous vote to repeal the health law, and for Republicans from states that expanded their Medicaid program, the options are anything but palatable.


Global News -
Latest Trump-backed Republican health care bill likely lacking votes to pass

Nevada Republican Dean Heller became the fifth GOP senator to declare his opposition to the party’s banner legislation to scuttle much of Barack Obama’s health care overhaul on Friday, more than enough to sink the measure and deliver a stinging rebuke to President Donald Trump unless some of them can be brought aboard.

Heller spoke at a news conference in Las Vegas with Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval, a Republican who has also assailed the House and Senate health care bills for cutting Medicaid.


New York Times -
The Health Debate Shows What Both Parties Care About Most

This is plain to see in the Senate health care bill, which would eliminate large parts of President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul.

More so than speeches and slogans ever could, the content of the Affordable Care Act and the Better Care Reconciliation Act, or Obamacare and Trumpcare, reveal the different values of the two parties. It’s hard to imagine a clearer statement of priorities than the competing approaches to health care in the United States.


New York Times -
Senate Health Plan Falls Short of Promise for Cheaper Care, Experts Say

President Trump and the Republicans have promised that their plan to overhaul the federal health care law will make medical coverage much more affordable.

Millions of Americans will pay more for an insurance policy that comes with a much steeper deductible under the new Senate plan, according to some health economists and insurance experts. It could also make it much harder to find a comprehensive plan covering various conditions ranging from heart disease to depression that would not be prohibitively expensive.


Global News -
Donald Trump calls on Republican senators to muster support for healthcare bill

President Donald Trump made calls to fellow Republicans in the U.S. Senate on Friday to mobilize support for their party’s healthcare overhaul while acknowledging the legislation is on a “very, very narrow path” to passage.

Five Republican senators have announced they will not support the bill, which is designed to repeal and replace Obamacare, in its current form. White House officials said on Friday that Trump has been in touch with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and made calls on Thursday and Friday to other lawmakers.


Washington Post -
Trump joins the effort to pass a health-care bill, but another GOP senator is opposed

President Trump and his allies are waging their most aggressive effort yet to help Senate GOP leaders pass an expansive health-care bill next week, but the endeavor encountered new resistance Friday when a fifth Republican senator said he does not support the bill as is.

As the vote-counting effort intensifies, Trump, who has said he supports the bill but it needs more “negotiation,” is trying to build consensus both in public and behind the scenes.


Washington Post -
In health-care bill, two prized Republican goals converge

The Senate Republican health-care bill would achieve a historic convergence of GOP priorities, placing major, permanent caps on Medicaid spending and providing a significant tax cut for wealthy Americans.

All together, it shows how long-term conservative goals of cutting taxes and entitlement spending have overtaken Trump’s agenda, as the bill faces critical votes in the Senate as soon as next week that could take it to the precipice of becoming law.


Washington Post -
Senate health-care bill panned by Republicans in Maryland and Virginia

A spokeswoman for Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R), who is up for reelection next year, said the Senate proposal does not work for Maryland and that Congress should start over.

Virginia GOP lawmakers object to provisions they say would penalize states such as Virginia that chose not to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. A spokeswoman for Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R), who is up for reelection next year, said the Senate proposal does not work for Maryland and that Congress should start over.


The Guardian -
Nevada senator becomes fifth Republican to oppose healthcare bill

Nevada senator Dean Heller has become the fifth Republican to come out in opposition to the current draft version of the Senate healthcare bill.

The score for the House bill projected that 23 million people would lose their insurance, whilst cutting the federal deficit by $119bn over a decade.


New York Times -
Republican Senator Vital to Health Bill’s Passage Won’t Support It

Senator Dean Heller of Nevada, perhaps the most vulnerable Republican facing re-election in 2018, said Friday he would not support the newly-released Senate health care overhaul as written, dealing a serious blow to his party’s attempt to repeal the Affordable Care Act just days before a showdown vote.

“This is the one opportunity we have to shine a light on this legislation and we will do it day and night,” said Senator Chris Van Hollen of Maryland, projecting the bill’s passage “a jump ball.”


New York Times -
Planned Parenthood Battle Could Sway Fortunes of G.O.P. Health Bill

Ms. Collins plans to amend the health care bill to restore Planned Parenthood funding, giving Democrats a conundrum: They may strongly favor supporting Planned Parenthood, but Democratic aides say senators must decide whether the bill has a better chance of passing with or without the defunding provision.

To cut off funding to Planned Parenthood for a single year — may be tangential to the wider war over the American health care system.


NBC News -
Growing GOP opposition to health care bill makes McConnell job harder

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's effort to pass the GOP health care plan got a little harder Friday when Nevada's Dean Heller became the fifth Republican senator to say he can't support the bill in its current form.

McConnell intends to put his health care bill up for a full Senate vote next week but he's facing increasing pressure from both ideological wings of his party to find the 50 votes he needs to pass the bill.


LA Times -
Nevada Sen. Heller -- a key swing vote -- says he opposes Senate healthcare bill

Nevada Sen. Dean Heller said Friday that he planned to vote to vote against the Republican healthcare bill, a potentially key defection.

Although the White House and Majority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky have said they plan further negotiations over the bill, "it's going to be very difficult to get me to a yes," Heller said at a news conference in Nevada with Gov. Brian Sandoval (R). Nevada Sen. Dean Heller said Friday that he planned to vote to vote against the Republican healthcare bill, a potentially key defection.


NBC News -
Abortion debate roils final health care push

The Senate health care bill contains sweeping new restrictions on abortion coverage and defunds Planned Parenthood, setting up a complicated fight that could potentially imperil its passage.

Under the Better Care Reconciliation Act released by Republicans on Thursday, insurance plans that customers can buy on the individual market with tax credits would be banned from covering abortion services, with exceptions for rape, incest and the health of the mother.


LA Times -
The Senate GOP hid the meanest things very deeply in its Obamacare repeal bill. We found them

The Affordable Care Act repeal bill unveiled Thursday by Senate Republicans has aptly drawn universal scorn from healthcare experts, hospital and physician groups and advocates for patients and the needy.

Some of these provisions match those in the House Republicans’ repeal bill passed May 4, and some are even harsher — more “mean,” to use a term President Trump himself applied to the House bill.


Fox News -
ObamaCare repeal push draws Obama into the fight

In a 939-word message to his 53 million Facebook followers, Obama declared the Senate’s newly unveiled ObamaCare replacement bill is “not a health care bill” but instead “a massive transfer of wealth from middle-class and poor families to the richest people in America.” He urged Senate Republicans to “step back and measure what’s really at stake” before voting on the bill, which was unveiled Thursday.


Washington Post -
Dean Heller of Nevada becomes fifth GOP senator to come out against health-care bill

Sen. Dean Heller (R-Nev.) said Friday that he cannot support Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s health-care bill without changes to it, becoming the fifth GOP senator to take that position since the bill was released on Thursday.

“I cannot support a piece of legislation that takes away insurance from tens of millions of Americans and hundreds of thousands of Nevadans,” Heller said in a news conference held in his home state.


CBS News -
Dean Heller becomes fifth Senate Republican to oppose GOP health care bill

Sen. Dean Heller of Nevada became the fifth Senate Republican on Friday to announce opposition to the Senate Republican health care plan to repeal and replace Obamacare, putting the legislation's passage in jeopardy ahead of a vote next week.

Hours after text was revealed Thursday, Sen. Rand Paul, R-Kentucky, announced with three other Senate Republicans that they opposed the bill in its current form because it doesn't go far enough in repealing President Obama's health care law.


CBS News -
Major medical groups call for rejection of Senate health bill

More than a dozen leading health and medical organizations are speaking out in opposition to the Senate's new health care plan to replace Obamacare.

Those calling for the rejection of the bill include groups that represent doctors in a number of medical specialties who say it would harm their patients. The American Academy of Pediatrics says it opposes the Republican plan because the youngest Americans would suffer, especially the poorest.


CBS News -
Trump calls GOP senators who oppose health care bill "good guys" and "friends of mine"

President Trump has an optimistic outlook on the future of the Senate's health care bill on Thursday, calling the four senators who are currently in opposition to the bill "good guys" and "friends of mine." "Well they're also four good guys and they are four friends of mine – and I think that they'll probably get there, we'll have to see," Mr. Trump said in an from an interview with Fox News' "Fox and Friends" recorded Thursday.


NBC News -
The main objection doctors have to the GOP health plan: Medicaid cuts

Groups representing pediatricians, cancer specialists, heart doctors and family physicians all agree: Both the House and the Senate offerings for fixing health care in the U.S. would make things worse, not better.

Medicaid is traditionally the state-federal health plan for the low-income, disabled, and children and cutting it will have repercussions across the health care system as people either wait until they’re at death’s door to get treatment, or head to emergency rooms that by law must save their lives, health policy experts stress.


Washington Post -
The Health 202: McConnell will be a legislative wizard if health care passes

If McConnell succeeds in uniting his deeply skeptical conference around the measure, he could legitimately be labeled a legislative wizard.

“It hands enormous tax cuts to the rich and to the drug and insurance industries, paid for by cutting health care for everybody else.”. Obama didn't mention Trump in his post. But he appeared to take a swipe at his successor and his reported characterization of the House bill as “mean."


Fox News -
Trump says Comey-Mueller friendship 'bothersome'

President Trump on Friday called the investigation into allegations of Russia collusion and claims he obstructed justice “ridiculous” while saying special counsel Robert Mueller’s friendship with fired FBI Director James Comey “is very bothersome,” during a wide-ranging interview on “Fox & Friends” that also touched on his stalled legislative agenda and the health care debate. “Robert Mueller is an honorable man and hopefully he’ll come up with an honorable conclusion,” Trump said, though he noted that Mueller and Comey were “very, very good friends” and also criticized the makeup of Mueller’s growing team of attorneys involved in the investigation.


Fox News -
Senate health care bill: How is it different from the House's legislation?

The Senate health care legislation is expected to provide coverage for 4 to 5 million additional people, according to an analysis from the health care advocacy group the Council for Affordable Health Coverage.

The Senate’s health care legislation would give tax credits based on age, income and geography — to a certain extent — like the Affordable Care Act already does, the Washington Post reported.


LA Times -
Republican senators seek changes in Obamacare repeal bill they can all agree on. It won't be easy

No sooner did Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell unveil the long-awaited Obamacare overhaul Thursday than Republican senators started openly negotiating what it would take to win their votes.

By banding together as a unified front of opposition, Cruz, Paul and other conservatives are borrowing from a strategy that proved effective for the House Freedom Caucus, which withheld a block of votes to demand changes to the House version. Just as the Freedom Caucus opened a direct line of negotiation with the White House, Paul said he had spoken personally to Trump this week about changes the senators wanted to make to the bill.


LA Times -
What the Senate healthcare bill could mean for Californians

Senate leaders have released their Obamacare repeal bill, which would slash federal funding for healthcare and could leave millions of Americans uninsured.

Below is a breakdown of some of the ways the Senate bill could affect healthcare coverage in California if it becomes law. The Affordable Care Act has had a huge impact on California, where roughly 4 million people have gained insurance and the percentage of uninsured residents has dropped more than half.


NBC News -
NBC/WSJ Poll: It's Trump's Base Against Everyone Else

President Trump job-approval rating in the latest NBC/WSJ poll stands at 40% — essentially unchanged from where it was a month ago at 39%.

Here are the numbers on which party would do a better job on the following issues:. Despite their defeat in GA-6, Democrats should a feel a bit heartened by their 8-point lead in congressional preference in the NBC/WSJ poll, 50%-42% — their biggest advantage in the poll since Oct. 2013 (during the government shutdown).


CBS News -
Key problem for Senate health care bill: Holdouts on both ends of GOP

The key problem for GOP leaders is that they have holdouts on both ends of their own party – and any move they make to win over one side would jeopardize support from the other, reports CBS News correspondent Nancy Cordes.

Senate GOP leaders tried to strike a balance between Obamacare, which they say is failing, and a House health care bill Mr. Trump called "mean."


ABC News -
The Note: The tale of the Trump 'tapes' isn't over

The tale of the "tapes" has been a sordid one, a head-scratcher that puts some of President Trump's least-subtle impulses on awkward display.

Even now, filling space otherwise reserved for a political victory lap and health care momentum in the Senate, Trump isn't quite closing out the possibility that tapes exist. (His words rarely seem chosen carefully, but "I did not make, and do not have, any such recordings" sounds like a lawyer's insert.)


CBS News -
President of Koch-funded group thinks GOP Obamacare repeal efforts are falling short

The president of the Koch brothers-funded political group Americans for Prosperity (AFP) is irked by the the Republican efforts to repeal and replace Obamacare.

At this point, on the day the Senate measure was introduced, four Republican senators agree with Phillips that the legislation does not, as written, constitute a true repeal of the ACA. Make sure it goes far enough in dismantling a law that hurts millions of Americans."


New York Times -
Pure Class Warfare, With Extra Contempt

Republican leaders believe that their voters are tribal enough, sufficiently walled off from information, that they’ll ignore the attack on their lives and keep voting R – indeed, that as they lose health care, get hit with crushing out-of-pocket bills, see their friends and neighbors face ruin, they’ll blame it on Democrats.

They’re doing it because they can, because they believe that the tribalism of their voters is strong enough that they will continue to support politicians who are ruining their lives.


The Week -
The Senate health bill is a scathing indictment of the Republican Party

In trying to defend this monstrosity — and whatever compromise Senate Republicans can make with their House counterparts, whose bill was even more vicious — Republicans will say that they share the same goals on health care as anyone else, a system that is affordable and comprehensive and protects everyone.

Let's begin with one of the party's two great goals, one that extends beyond this bill to other issues like taxes and regulation.


The Guardian -
Trumpcare is like a vampire, set on sinking its teeth into the poor

Of course, if you are trying not to reduce inequality, but to exacerbate it, this makes little sense: better to bleed Medicaid, transfuse the cash into the pockets of the rich, and call the whole bloodsucking endeavor an exercise in “freedom.”

Yet Trumpcare has risen again: on Thursday, the Senate released its Obamacare repeal bill, though its fate is still uncertain. The Senate draft is in some respects a watered-down version of the House’s, yet it is no less toxic: watering down cyanide, you see, only makes it so safe.


New York Times -
Late-Night Hosts Tear Into Senate Health Care Bill

The late-night hosts on Thursday took their cracks at Senate Republicans’ newly unveiled health care bill, which makes deep cuts to Medicaid and allows insurance companies more power over what their plans cover and how much they cost.

“The Senate health care bill came out today, and I saw that it would cut a tax on indoor tanning — which is the biggest proof so far that Trump was actually working on the bill.”


Wall Street Jurnal -
Obamacare ‘tanning tax’ once labeled as a health-care affront to women is cut in Senate bill

The Senate legislation to roll back Obamacare has stoked again the largely partisan argument over whether the proposal — which some give only a long shot at passage as written — is a tax bill or a health-care bill.

Details within the 100 pages revealed at least one very specific tax reversal — cutting the 10% excise tax on indoor tanning-bed operators that the Affordable Care Act slapped on the controversial businesses.


LA Times -
You asked, we answered. Here are some of our readers' questions on California's proposed single-payer plan

We had some questions about California’s high-profile bill to establish a single-payer system, in which the state would foot the bill for nearly all healthcare costs of its residents.

Michael Hiltzik: The challenges in setting up a California single-payer system are daunting — but not insurmountable


LA Times -
Senate Obamacare repeal plan would slash federal healthcare funding for Medicaid

Senate Republicans unveiled a draft bill on Thursday to roll back the Affordable Care Act, including a drastic reduction in federal healthcare spending that threatens to leave millions more Americans uninsured, drive up costs for poor consumers and further destabilize the nation’s health insurance markets.

The legislative outline, which Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s team wrote largely behind closed doors, hews closely to the Obamacare repeal bill passed last month by House Republicans, though it includes important differences.


CBS News -
Trump tweets he is "very supportive" of Senate health care bill

President Trump tweeted Thursday night that he is "very supportive" of the Senate health care proposal, after an intense day on Capitol Hill following the GOP unveiling of the plan after weeks of secrecy. Fox News' "The Five" released a preview clip from an interview with Mr. Trump on Friday morning's "Fox and Friends" where Mr. Trump called the four senators who oppose the bill "friends of mine - I think that they'll probably get there."


Washington Post -
‘Meanness at the core:’ Obama jumps back into political fray to slam Trump, GOP on health care

The 44th president did not mention his successor, Donald Trump, but his scathing criticism and urgent tone — imploring his supporters to speak out against the “fundamental meanness at the core of this legislation” — set up a direct public fight with the current White House occupant over the future of the nation’s health care system. “I am very supportive of the Senate #HealthcareBill,” Trump wrote in a tweet a short while later.


Washington Post -
How Trump’s dubious claims make the entire government react

The words leapt from President Trump’s mind to Twitter at 8:26 a.m. on the Friday after he fired FBI director James B. Comey, setting off a cascade of activity inside and outside of the federal government to figure out what, exactly, he meant.

His oft-repeated assertion during the campaign that the wall along the southern border would be paid for by Mexico is one that lawmakers in Trump’s own party believe will never happen — yet they and others in the government continue to look for some way to help the president save face.


LA Times -
Recipe for disaster: How not to cook up healthcare reform

In case anyone was wondering what would happen if a handful of fairly wealthy, well-insured men gathered in a room and quietly tried to reinvent the $3-trillion U.S. healthcare system without any input from medical experts, patient advocates or others who know what they’re talking about, the U.S. Senate stepped up Thursday with the answer.

No other developed nation provides guaranteed issue without a mandate because it’s a surefire recipe for higher premiums.


LA Times -
Let the political jockeying begin as Republican senators deal on Obamacare repeal

No sooner did Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell unveil the long-awaited Obamacare overhaul Thursday than Republican senators started openly negotiating what it would take to win their votes.

Get ready for drama-filled days of mock hand-wringing, political jockeying and backroom brinkmanship as the Senate GOP healthcare plan heads toward a hoped-for vote next week. No sooner did Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell unveil the long-awaited Obamacare overhaul Thursday than Republican senators started openly negotiating what it would take to win their votes.


Fox News -
Senate health care bill: 4 key Republicans come out against GOP plan

Key Republican senators came out against the Senate Republican health care plan on Thursday, and their opposition is enough to defeat the package before a vote.

Senate Republicans released a 142-page draft of their version of a "repeal and replace" health care plan on Thursday titled, “Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017,” which eliminates a majority of ObamaCare provisions, already drawing backlash from Senate Democrats, and even some congressional Republicans.


LA Times -
Four GOP senators say they oppose current Obamacare repeal bill as political jockeying begins

Ted Cruz, Mike Lee, Ron Johnson and Rand Paul — jointly announced their opposition to the GOP’s draft Obamacare repeal bill Thursday, setting the stage for an intense political showdown ahead of next week’s vote.

“Currently, for a variety of reasons, we are not ready to vote for this bill, but we are open to negotiation and obtaining more information before it is brought to the floor,” the senators said in a statement.


LA Times -
Senate GOP's Obamacare repeal bill will cost lives, but fatten the wallets of millionaires

As the newly released draft shows, it’s a rollback of health coverage for millions of Americans that could cost the lives of tens of thousands a year.

The Congressional Budget Office projected that the repeal bill passed by the House in May would cost 23 million Americans their health coverage by 2026. Among the programs bound to be undermined, they said, are state responses to the opioid addiction crisis, of which as much as 41% of the cost has been covered by Medicaid.


LA Times -
Republicans aren't just repealing Obamacare, they are gutting a guarantee of healthcare for the poor

In essence, Trumpcare would abandon the federal government’s 52-year responsibility to guarantee healthcare for those unable to afford it on their own.

The first number represents an estimate of the children who would lose healthcare coverage under the bill Republican senators worked on in secret and finally unveiled on Thursday. The second number reflects the total amount of Medicaid cuts — in the form of the elimination of the Medicaid expansion for working families that was part of the Affordable Care Act, capped federal spending for Medicaid and additional cuts proposed in the president’s budget — that would go to pay for tax breaks for billionaires.


CBS News -
3 key things to know about the Senate health care bill

The Senate bill has edged away from the age-based tax credits in the House bill in favor of Affordable Care Act-style income-based subsidies.

Thus, you may see insurers offering scaled-back policies that offer lower premiums but also lower coverage, including no maternity care, no mental health care, no cancer care, etc. Young healthy people may be drawn to these less restrictive policies while older, less healthy people will end up in a more expensive coverage pool.


CBS News -
Obama: Senate proposal is "not a health care bill," but a "transfer of wealth"

Former President Barack Obama slammed the Senate GOP's health care proposal released Thursday as "not a health care bill," but rather, a "transfer of wealth from middle-class and poor families to the richest people in America." Obama said he hopes the proposed "discussion draft" of the Senate's health care bill that repeals key components of his signature Affordable Care Act aims at more than "simply undoing something that Democrats did."


The Guardian -
Obama attacks Republican health bill as 'massive transfer of wealth' to the rich

Barack Obama sharply condemned the healthcare plan unveiled by Senate Republicans on Thursday as a “massive transfer of wealth” to the rich, at the expense of poor and middle-class Americans.

In a Facebook post hours after the Republican bill was made public, the former president made some of his most pointed comments since leaving office in defense of what remains the most signature accomplishment of his two terms.


Washington Post -
Obama on the GOP health-care plan: ‘This bill will do you harm.’

Former president Barack Obama posted a nearly 1,000-word critique of the Senate health-care bill Thursday on Facebook, warning, “This bill will do you harm.”

Calling the GOP leadership’s bill “a massive transfer of wealth from middle-class and poor families to the richest people in America,” he called on Americans to push back against congressional Republicans. “Simply put, if there’s a chance you might get sick, get old, or start a family — this bill will do you harm,” the former president wrote.


New York Times -
McConnell’s Calculation May Be That He Still Wins by Losing

According to lawmakers who were at the unveiling, members from the left and right ends of the party’s spectrum were deeply critical of the effort.

“I have serious concerns about the bill’s impact on the Nevadans who depend on Medicaid,” Senator Dean Heller, his party’s most vulnerable incumbent in the 2018 elections, said of his constituents. Senator Susan Collins of Maine rendered her own lukewarm judgment, while Senator Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia simply said she would read it, with all the enthusiasm of a college senior faced with a weekend assignment of Proust.


NBC News -
Four senate Republicans say they can't support health care bill yet

Four Republican senators say they will not vote for the GOP health care bill unless changes are made, putting passage of the bill at risk just hours after it was unveiled.

With Republicans holding 52 seats in the Senate and no Democrats expected to support the legislation, GOP leaders can only afford to lose two votes among their own ranks. The four conservative GOP senators — Rand Paul of Kentucky, Mike Lee of Utah, Ron Johnson of Wisconsin and Ted Cruz of Texas — released a joint statement Thursday afternoon outlining their concerns:. "Currently, for a variety of reasons, we are not ready to vote for this bill, but we are open to negotiation and obtaining more information before it is brought to the floor.


The Week -
5 mind-blowing things about the GOP's 'Better Care' act

It covers more people than Medicare, most of its beneficiaries are children, the elderly, and the disabled, and it pays the bulk of Americans' long-term care and nursing home costs.

In other words, the whole bill is basically a giant giveaway to the wealthy, paid for by cutting health care to the poor.


BBC -
Obamacare v Republican plan compared

Republican plan: Alters formula for tax credits, which will expand the benefit to more middle-class Americans but probably raise the costs for some elderly and less-affluent individuals.

Obamacare: Insurers can charge older Americans no more than three times the cost for younger Americans. Republican plan: Insurers can charge older Americans five times as much as younger Americans. Also bans women from using federal tax credits to buy a plan that covers abortion.


CBS News -
At least 4 Senate Republicans oppose health care bill, putting it in jeopardy

Four Senate Republicans announced Thursday that they currently oppose the health care bill to repeal and replace Obamacare that was released only hours earlier, putting its passage in jeopardy.

"There are provisions in this draft that represent an improvement to our current health care system, but it does not appear this draft as written will accomplish the most important promise that we made to Americans: to repeal Obamacare and lower their health care costs."


NBC News -
How the new health bill affects the middle class

The foundation plans to release an online calculator in the coming days to review the impact of the proposed bill.

However, the conservative Heritage Foundation said that shrinking Medicaid funding, getting rid of mandates and repealing Obamacare's taxes on the wealthy "will help reduce premiums and improve the environment that contributed to unaffordable (and now disappearing) health plans." Should the bill become law, patients not covered by an employer's insurance will need to figure out what's a better deal.


NBC News -
Inside the health care bill: Trump wanted 'heart.' He didn't get it

The 142-page Senate health care bill released on Thursday is easy to summarize: It cuts health care spending for low-income and middle-income Americans and uses the savings to finance large tax cuts for the wealthy and the medical industry.

In this regard, the bill, which is called the Better Care Reconciliation Act, is broadly similar to the American Health Care Act that passed the House in May.


Global News -
Obamacare repeal bill: 7 key changes proposed for U.S. health care

U.S. Senate Republicans unveiled their version of legislation that could replace Obamacare on Thursday, proposing several key changes to former president Barack Obama’s signature health-care law.

While the draft bill has drawn criticism from around the country, and especially from Democrats, U.S. President Donald Trump said he’s happy with the overall proposal. U.S. Senate Republicans unveiled their version of legislation that could replace Obamacare on Thursday, proposing several key changes to former president Barack Obama’s signature health-care law.


BBC -
Republican senators' revolt puts health bill in jeopardy

Four Republican senators have said they will not vote for a new healthcare plan to repeal Obamacare, throwing the bill's fate into uncertainty.

Protesters railed against the Senate healthcare bill during a sit-in outside of Mr McConnell's office on Capitol Hill.


The Guardian -
Four Republican senators plan to oppose Senate healthcare bill

Four Republican senators are preparing to announce their opposition to the new Senate healthcare bill, putting the GOP’s attempt to overhaul Barack Obama’s signature legislation in jeopardy.

With the expectation that all 48 Democrats will vote against the bill, the Senate leadership can only afford two defections, which would still require a tiebreaking vote from Mike Pence, the vice-president, for the bill to pass.


Washington Post -
Senate Republicans’ claim of saving individual health insurance markets could prove hollow

In celebrating the release of his chamber’s Republican health-care plan, Sen. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.) said Thursday it promises to “bring financial certainty to insurance markets.”

Also unlike the House bill, the Senate plan would provide millions of Americans with federal subsidies to pay insurance premiums by accounting for how much health plans tend to cost in different communities — the same approach taken by the ACA.


CBS News -
What Senate Republicans are saying about their health care bill

Senate Republicans unveiled a "discussion draft" of the bill Thursday of their plan to repeal and replace Obamacare that would end the health care law's penalties for people who don't buy insurance, cut back the expansion of Medicaid, while keeping protections for people with pre-existing conditions, compared to the House-passed bill.

There are provisions in this draft that represent an improvement to our current health care system, but it does not appear this draft as written will accomplish the most important promise that we made to Americans: to repeal Obamacare and lower their health care costs."


Wall Street Jurnal -
Senate Republicans’ health bill boosts hospital and health-care stocks — but will the gains last?

Shares of hospital-system operators rallied as much as 8% on Thursday following the release of the Senate Republican health bill, which appears more favorable to their interests than the House-passed bill.

The Senate health bill “tries to phase in the pain” of changes to the Affordable Care Act, such as Medicaid spending cuts, said Spencer Perlman, director of health-care research at Veda Partners, who described the Senate draft as having “the same architecture” as the House bill but “nicer furnishings.”


The Week -
9 Trump promises the GOP's 'Better Care' act breaks

While President Trump has quietly implored Republican lawmakers to make their approach to health care less "mean," and to give the bill "more heart," the White House is apparently supportive of "Better Care," much as the administration got behind the House's narrowly passed American Health Care Act. "It's going to be very good," Trump promised Thursday.

After all, many of the promises Trump made on the campaign trail and in his early days in office are directly contradicted by the Senate's plan.


The Guardian -
Trumpcare is a dangerous gamble. The prognosis isn't good

Instead, we have Donald Trump, who held a victory ceremony for the House vote on Trumpcare, before condemning the same vote as “mean”.

Trump has already shown no appetite for the complex details of healthcare: a lack of interest that helped scupper the first House vote on Trumpcare. What he does care about are the polls, and the numbers do not look good for his first big congressional campaign.


New York Times -
Senate Health Care Bill Includes Deep Cuts to Medicaid

Senate Republicans, who have promised a repeal of the Affordable Care Act for seven years, took a major step on Thursday toward that goal, unveiling a bill to cut Medicaid deeply and end the health law’s mandate that most Americans have health insurance.

The 142-page bill would create a new system of federal tax credits to help people buy health insurance, while offering states the ability to drop many of the benefits required by the Affordable Care Act, like maternity care, emergency services and mental health treatment.


ABC News -
Senate health bill met with protests, mixed reactions

Senate Republican leaders unveiled a "discussion draft" of their long-awaited health care bill Thursday, a part of their party's ongoing efforts to "repeal and replace" the Affordable Care Act.

Some Republicans said they liked how the Senate bill, which was drafted behind closed doors by a small group of Senate leadership and committee staff, differed from the House bill, including the way the Senate bill calculates the value of tax credits that help individuals pay for insurance.


CBS News -
Paul Ryan hasn't read Senate health care bill but says, "I've been briefed"

Soon after GOP senators released their "discussion draft" version of the health care bill, titled the "Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017," House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wisconsin, said he had not yet read the bill. "I've been briefed on the Senate version.

When asked about the drafting process of the health care bill, which had been kept very private by the 13 male Republican senators who worked on the legislation behind closed doors, Ryan said that he did not see anything wrong with how his congressional colleagues crafted the bill.


NBC News -
Bill to disaggregate Asian American, Pacific Islander data passes New York Assembly

The New York State Assembly once again passed a bill this week that would require certain state agencies, commissions, and boards to collect and publish data on Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders.

Most New York state agencies, according to the bill, do not comply with existing state law, which already requires data collection for certain Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander ethnicities, or have not made that information accessible to the public.


The Guardian -
Senate Republicans release healthcare bill that will affect coverage for millions

After weeks of secret negotiations, the US Senate has released an anticipated draft of a bill that could upend the healthcare system for millions of Americans.

Senate Republicans heard about the substance of the healthcare reform effort for the first time Thursday morning, just days before leadership intends to hold a vote. Experts believe the bill could leave millions of Americans without health insurance, and could have a stark impact on vulnerable populations such as recovering drug addicts, aging middle-class baby boomers and women and children.


BBC -
Senate Republicans unveil healthcare bill

Senate Republicans have unveiled a plan to overhaul the US healthcare system, including drastic cuts to a government health programme for the poor.

The Senate plan phases out the expansion of Medicaid, a government health programme for the low-income Americans, more gradually than the House bill. Senator McConnell expects the bill to come to the Senate floor as early as next week, when the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office releases the plan's estimated cost and impact on Americans.


Global News -
Senate unveils plan to overhaul Obamacare

Senate Republicans would cut Medicaid, end penalties for people not buying insurance and erase a raft of tax increases as part of their long-awaited plan to scuttle ‘s health care law, congressional aides and lobbyists say.

In a departure from the version the House approved last month, which President Donald Trump privately called “mean,” the Senate plan would drop the House’s waivers allowing states to let insurers boost premiums on some people with pre-existing conditions.


Wall Street Jurnal -
Senate Republicans Unveil Obamacare Repeal Bill: Live Analysis

As the outlines of the Senate health bill come into focus with a vote expected next week, it is possible to see how the Senate approach may diverge from the House-passed version and also from the 2010 Affordable Care Act.

Democrats have begun escalating their parliamentary and messaging tactics against the Republican health bill as a Senate vote approaches, hoping their opposition resonates with voters.


CBS News -
Motorcyclist detained after riding through San Francisco health care protest

A man who allegedly rode his motorcycle through a crowd of activists blocking a San Francisco street during a Wednesday afternoon protest against the GOP health care bill was detained by police after the dangerous stunt.

CBS San Francisco reports protesters had gathered outside the San Francisco Federal Building at 7th and Mission streets at around 12:30 p.m. and were conducting a "die-in," in which a group of around 20 people laid down on Seventh Street to block traffic, when the incident occurred.


CBS News -
GOP Senate health care bill released

Senate Republicans unveiled a "discussion draft" of the bill Thursday of their plan to repeal and replace Obamacare that would end the health care law's penalties for people who don't buy insurance, cut back an expansion of Medicaid, but would keep more protections for people with pre-existing conditions, compared to a House-passed bill.

Nearly three-quarters of Americans said Senate Republicans should discuss their health care plans publicly, according to a CBS News poll released Tuesday.


Washington Post -
The Health 202: Here's what's in the Senate health-care bill

Yesterday afternoon, The Health 202 scooped the major details of the draft health-care legislation that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.)

Like the the House bill passed in May, the Senate version would put big dents in the Affordable Care Act, repealing just about all of its taxes, pulling back on Medicaid expansion and ditching the individual mandate to buy coverage and the employer mandate to offer it.


New York Times -
Senate Leaders Unveil Bill to Repeal the Affordable Care Act

Senate Republicans, who have promised a repeal of the Affordable Care Act for seven years, took a major step on Thursday toward that goal, unveiling a bill to cut Medicaid deeply and end the health law’s mandate that most Americans have health insurance.

The bill would create a new system of federal tax credits to help people buy health insurance, while offering states the ability to drop many of the benefits required by the Affordable Care Act, like maternity care, emergency services and mental health treatment.


NBC News -
Senate health care bill includes deep Medicaid cuts

Senate Republicans are unveiling a draft of their legislation to revamp the government's role in the nation's health care system Thursday morning, a proposal that will include big reductions to Medicaid spending, tax cuts and the elimination of the mandate for individuals to purchase insurance.

Lobbyist sources say the bill winds down the expanded Medicaid program under Obamacare after 2020 — a longer timeline than the House health care bill that was passed in May.


ABC News -
Senate Republicans to unveil 'discussion draft' of health care bill

Seven weeks after the House of Representatives passed the American Health Care Act, Senate Republicans are set to unveil their version of the health care bill Thursday.

The CBO estimates that under the version of the American Health Care Act passed by the House would leave 24 million more Americans uninsured by 2026, as compared to estimates under the current law, the Affordable Care Act. Republican leaders expect the new CBO score to come on Monday, but are hopeful it could come as soon as Friday.


Washington Post -
Senate GOP leaders set to unveil health-care bill

Senate Republicans on Thursday morning plan to release a health-care bill that would curtail federal Medicaid funding, repeal taxes on the wealthy and eliminate funding for Planned Parenthood as part of an effort to fulfill a years-long promise to undo Barack Obama’s signature health-care law.

The bill is an attempt to strike a compromise between existing law and a bill passed by the House in May as Republicans struggle to advance their vision for the country’s health-care system even though they now control both chambers of Congress and the White House.


NBC News -
What To Expect in the Senate Health Care Bill

At 9:30 am ET, Senate Republicans will unveil the draft of their highly anticipated health care legislation to their members, per NBC’s Frank Thorp and Leigh Ann Caldwell.

The Senate proposal would cut off expanded Medicaid funding for states more gradually than the House bill but would enact deeper long-term cuts to the health care program for low-income Americans.” “While the House legislation would peg federal insurance subsidies to age, the Senate bill would link them to income, as the Affordable Care Act does.


The Guardian -
Senate Republicans to release draft of healthcare bill as details emerge

Senate Republican leaders are set to unveil draft language of legislation that would repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA), after weeks of secrecy surrounding their effort to prepare a healthcare bill to be voted on as early as next week.

According to reports in the Washington Post and Politico, sourced to a draft that was circulating among lobbyists and aides, the Senate proposal would repeal key provisions of the ACA, restructure healthcare subsidies, and cut funding for Medicaid, the health-care program for low-income Americans.


NBC News -
A California scientist who studies climate change is running for Congress

She's running for the House of Representatives as a Democrat in California's 25th Congressional District, with a pledge bring "good science" to Washington.

In the wake of Trump announcing that the country would pull out of the global coalition meant to curb emissions that cause climate change, governors of states like Hawaii and California announced that they would step up their efforts to reduce emissions to fill the void left by the federal government's inaction.


CBS News -
Motorcyclist detained after riding through San Francisco heath care protest

A man who allegedly rode his motorcycle through a crowd of activists blocking a San Francisco street during a Wednesday afternoon protest against the GOP health care bill was detained by police after the dangerous stunt.

CBS San Francisco reports protesters had gathered outside the San Francisco Federal Building at 7th and Mission streets at around 12:30 p.m. and were conducting a "die-in," in which a group of around 20 people laid down on Seventh Street to block traffic, when the incident occurred.


New York Times -
Canada’s Trump Strategy: Go Around Him

“I’m anxious about how all this could change if there’s a decision that puts up an insurmountable barrier,” she said, adding, “There’s a lot of uncertainty, and I will say quite candidly, our businesses here in Ontario are very nervous.”

As President Trump disrupts alliances across the map, nearly every level of government in Canada has taken on new duties in a quietly audacious campaign to cajole, contain and if necessary coerce the Americans.


LA Times -
Senate set to unveil secretive Obamacare repeal bill, with a vote likely next week

Senate Republicans are set to unveil their sweeping bill to roll back the Affordable Care Act on Thursday, a secretive effort that would dramatically reduce federal spending on healthcare and potentially leave millions more Americans uninsured.

If Senate Republicans approve the bill, even by a narrow vote, it would give their repeal effort momentum, and likely enable the House and Senate to resolve their legislative differences and send a bill to Trump’s desk to sign into law.


The Week -
Democrats don't have a policy problem. They have a marketing problem.

Democrats continued their 2017 run of being unable to win special elections in strongly Republican districts on Tuesday.

In a piece published as the returns were coming in that got a good deal of attention, Vox's Matthew Yglesias writes that "one thing [Democrats] might want to try is developing a substantive policy agenda to run on." That would be far preferable than having to argue about how mad voters were about a video a comedian posted on Twitter.


CBS News -
GOP Senate health bill would cut Medicaid, end ACA tax increases

Top Senate Republicans plan to release a health care bill Thursday that would do away with the individual mandate, Obamacare's taxes and cut back the expansion of Medicaid, although at a slower rate than the House-passed bill, CBS News' John Nolen reports.

The Senate's proposal for dismantling President Obama's signature health care law would also keep more protections for people with preexisting conditions than the House bill did.


LA Times -
Trump says he hopes Senate healthcare bill has 'heart'

As Senate Republicans prepare to unveil their version of an Obamacare alternative, President Trump expressed his hope for a final plan “with heart.” “I can’t guarantee anything, but I hope we’re going to surprise you with a really good plan,” Trump said at a campaign-style rally in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on Wednesday night.

The White House said administration officials have been fully briefed on the details of a Senate healthcare bill that has been drafted with unprecedented secrecy, in advance of its planned release early Thursday.


New York Times -
Abortion Adds Obstacle as Republicans Plan to Unveil Health Bill

Abortion flared up Wednesday as the latest hot-button issue to complicate passage of a bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, which Senate Republican leaders hope to unveil on Thursday and pass next week.

If that provision is dropped, a bill that has already elicited deep misgivings among moderate Republicans — and stiff resistance from Democrats, health care providers and patient advocacy groups — could also generate concern among abortion opponents, as well as conservative lawmakers.


Washington Post -
Senate Republicans set to release health-care bill, but divisions remain

Senate Republicans on Thursday plan to release a health-care bill that would curtail federal Medicaid funding, repeal taxes on the wealthy and eliminate funding for Planned Parenthood as part of an effort to fulfill a years-long promise to undo Barack Obama’s signature health-care law.

The bill is an attempt to strike a compromise between existing law and a bill passed by the House in May as Republicans struggle to advance their vision for the country’s health-care system even though they now control both Congress and the White House.


NBC News -
Nancy Pelosi faces heat from Democrats after Georgia loss

As Democrats point fingers in the wake of Jon Ossoff's loss in a Georgia special election on Tuesday, some of them are aimed at Nancy Pelosi, the party’s longtime House leader who appeared in almost every GOP attack ad broadcast in the most expensive House race in history.

The Congressional Leadership Fund, a Ryan-aligned GOP super PAC that spent heavily in Georgia, said its polling showed Pelosi to be one of the most effective attack messages in the race as they tried to undercut Ossoff's portrayal of himself as a noncontroversial moderate.


NBC News -
Where are the big issues to look for in the Senate health care bill

Senate Republican leaders are set to release details of their legislation to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act after weeks of closed-door negotiations.

The House has two options: either vote on the Senate bill, which could be a heavy lift after a difficult vote in the House just a month ago, or the two bodies go to conference, come up the exact same bill and then each body votes on it again.


CBS News -
White House aims to get tax overhaul bill to Congress in September

The White House plans to privately negotiate a massive overhaul of the tax system with Republican leaders in Congress, possibly giving rank-and-file members little if any say over the finished product, according to a top aide to President Donald Trump.

Cohn said the White House and congressional Republicans are working to get a tax reform bill to the floor of Congress during the first couple weeks of September, a White House spokesperson confirmed with CBS News.


Washington Post -
Senate health-care draft repeals Obamacare taxes, provides bigger subsidies for low-income Americans than House bill

Senate leaders on Wednesday were putting the final touches on legislation that would reshape a big piece of the U.S. health-care system by dramatically rolling back Medicaid while providing a softer landing to Americans who stand to lose coverage gained under the Affordable Care Act.

The Senate proposal cuts off Medicaid expansion more gradually than the House bill, but would enact deeper long-term cuts to the health-care program for low-income Americans.


Global News -
Senate approves most of Federal budget, but removes booze tax

The Senate gave final approval Wednesday to an amended version of the budget implementation bill, deleting provisions that would impose a so-called escalator tax on booze.

He dodged Wednesday when repeatedly prodded by Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer and other Tory MPs to say whether he’ll listen to the senators and drop the budget measure, which would allow the government to automatically increase the federal excise tax on beer, wine and spirits every year by the rate of inflation.


Washington Post -
Republicans are thrilled by their victory in Georgia, but the celebration may be brief

Republicans in the conservative Atlanta suburbs — and across the country — were elated Wednesday after their party beat back Democrats in a competitive special election and avoided a loss that could have damaged President Trump’s hopes of enacting his agenda.

Trump’s agenda remains stalled on Capitol Hill, and Tuesday’s win failed to resolve mounting concerns among Republicans about next year’s midterm contests.


Washington Post -
Republicans who decried Obamacare secrecy now writing legislation in secret

Rarely, however, has the double standard been so flagrant as now, when Republicans are scrambling to keep their promise to “repeal and replace Obamacare.”

That’s for sure,” said Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska), who added that she cannot commit to a position on the legislation because she has no idea what is in it.


Reuters -
After weeks of secrecy, Senate to unveil healthcare bill

Republicans in the chamber have been working for weeks behind closed doors on legislation aimed at repealing and replacing major portions of the Affordable Care Act, former Democratic President Barack Obama's signature healthcare law, popularly known as Obamacare.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said on Tuesday the Senate healthcare bill would be different from the House version, but he did not elaborate.


Fox News -
Georgia race: Trump casts GOP winning streak as rejection of Dem ‘obstruction’

The Georgia race effectively had become a national battle, with Democrats pumping millions behind Ossoff and eager to cast a victory as a referendum on Trump.

"All the Fake News, all the money spent = 0.". White House Counselor Kellyanne Conway also basked in the Republican winning streak, and dealt a cutting jab to those who predicted an Ossoff victory and accompanying voter rebuke of Trump -- both of which failed to emerge. "Thanks to everyone who breathlessly and snarkily proclaimed #GA06 as a 'referendum on POTUS @realDonaldTrump'.


CBS News -
Senate Democrats united in trying to defeat "mean" GOP health care bill

Senate Democrats gathered outside the Capitol on Wednesday morning to protest the health care bill currently being drafted by their Republican colleagues, which is to be unveiled Thursday and could be voted on as early as next week.

"Every Democrat, from Bernie Sanders to Joe Manchin and everyone in between, is united in defeating this 'mean' bill," said Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-New York, a reference to the fact that President Trump called the House version of the bill "mean" last week.


CBS News -
What the Georgia special election may mean to Democrats and Republicans

Handel's win only buys some breathing room, as Russia investigations, White House intrigue and policy disagreements on Capitol Hill continue to stall the GOP agenda in Washington.

Democrats had hoped a victory by Democrat Jon Ossoff over Republican Karen Handel would be a referendum against President Trump, and give them momentum and a winning strategy to succeed in other races. But Mr. Trump's low approval ratings weren't enough to sink Handel, especially given that neither candidate dwelled on Mr. Trump during the campaign.


Wall Street Jurnal -
How the Republican health plan could hurt those with employer health insurance

The Republicans’ American Health Care Act is expected to affect employer-based health insurance and, through it, as many as 27 million people, according to a new estimate from the left-leaning think tank the Center for American Progress.

Talk of repealing the Affordable Care Act has largely focused on how it’ll change health insurance for the millions of people who don’t get it through work or public programs.


BBC -
Top Macron ally Bayrou quits French government

Interior Minister Gérard Collomb told French newspaper Le Figaro [in French] the legislation would involve four flagship methods: creating protection areas around potential targets, closing places of worship which incite terrorism, replacing house arrest with personalised measures, and placing a judge in overall charge of searches and the resulting documents.

France's Justice Minister, François Bayrou, has handed in his resignation hours before President Emmanuel Macron reshuffles his government.


The Guardian -
Two more ministers quit Macron adminstration amid funding inquiry

France’s president Emmanuel Macron appears to have ditched his centrist allies after two more high-profile government ministers resigned after a month in office.

Days after a second-round legislative vote that gave Macron a clear majority in the lower house of parliament – even without the support of the centrist MoDem party – justice minister François Bayrou, the MoDem president, announced he was standing down.


ABC News -
ANALYSIS: What Handel's win, Ossoff's loss means for their parties

Republican Karen Handel avoided a major upset Tuesday night, winning the special election in Georgia’s 6th Congressional District.

Ossoff’s fiancé told the crowd they changed the face of the district, but not enough to send a Democrat to Washington.


The Guardian -
French defence minister resigns over inquiry into misuse of funds

France’s newly appointed defence minister Sylvie Goulard has resigned from government after a magistrate launched a preliminary investigation into allegations her party misused European parliament funds.

Ferrand, who is accused of favouring his partner when looking to hire an office for a Brittany-based health “mutuelle” of which he was president, has also denied any wrongdoing, favouritism or conflict of interest.


The Guardian -
Emmanuel Macron plans cabinet reshuffle after parliamentary win

The French president, Emmanuel Macron, will announce a new cabinet within days after his start-up centrist political movement swept to a commanding majority in parliamentary elections on a promise of renovating the country’s politics.

Macron will need to win greater public support for his policies, particularly from sections of the electorate that have not so far backed his programme, including lower income households and blue collar workers.


Reuters -
'Real victory will be in 5 years,' Macron camp says after election win

The election saw a record number of women voted into parliament, due largely to Macron's decision to field a gender-balanced candidate list.

"The real victory wasn't last night, it will be in five years time when we have really changed things," Castaner told RTL radio. Though lower than forecast by pollsters in the run-up to the vote, Macron's majority swept aside France's main traditional parties, humiliating the Socialist and conservative The Republicans party that alternated in power for decades.


CBS News -
President Emmanuel Macron's party grabs solid victory in French parliamentary vote

PARIS -- President Emmanuel Macron's party, including untested novices, will be sweeping into the lower house of the French parliament, hogging a clear majority of seats after winning an overwhelming victory in Sunday's elections and clinching the young leader's hold on power.

The May 7 election of the 39-year-old Macron, himself untested, upended France's political landscape, a phenomenon that continued with the parliamentary victory of a party that didn't exist 14 months ago.


Reuters -
Macron wins strong parliamentary majority, estimates show

The result, based on official figures and pollster projections, redraws France's political landscape, humiliating the Socialist and conservative parties that alternated in power for decades until Macron's election in May.

The scale of LREM's projected win means Macron will enjoy an absolute majority even without the support of alliance partner Francois Bayrou and Modem, lending him a freer hand for reforms and room for a government reshuffle should he choose to carry one out.


Reuters -
How Macron worked the system for a giant parliamentary majority

Macron's rivals did not see that the system could help a party created only a year ago, which had never fielded candidates in a parliamentary election before, and whose leader, at 39, had been unknown to the public three years ago.

Macron probably had in mind his political history class from Sciences-Po where - like generations of French leaders before him - he was taught about the subtleties of the Fifth Republic's constitutional system.


Reuters -
With parliament in the bag, France's Macron faces union test

Already assured according to official figures and set to be over 350 seats in the 577 seat lower house according to projections - means Macron and his year-old centrist party can now count on lawmakers to give his government powers to wave the reform through without lengthy negotiations in parliament.

Jean-Luc Melenchon, the leader of the far left France Unbowed party, was among those promising a "social struggle" if Macron bulldozed workers' rights, which are cherished by many in France. "I hereby inform the new powers that be not a foot of ground will be given up in the labor law struggle," Melenchon said in a fiery speech after winning a parliamentary seat for Marseille.


NBC News -
Emmanuel Macron's party sweeps French parliamentary elections

President Emmanuel Macron's party, including untested novices, will be sweeping into the lower house of the French parliament, hogging a clear majority of seats after winning an overwhelming victory in Sunday's elections and clinching the young leader's hold on power.

The May 7 election of the Macron, 39, himself untested, upended France's political landscape, a phenomenon that continued with the parliamentary victory of a party that didn't exist 14 months ago.


Washington Post -
French parliamentary elections give big boost to Macron

Emmanuel Macron was projected to win a large parliamentary majority Sunday, with the centrist party he founded little more than a year ago triumphing at the polls.

“It reflects a judgment of the first weeks in power of Emmanuel Macron," said Dominique Moïsi, a foreign policy adviser at the Institut Montaigne, a Paris think tank close to the Macron campaign. For analysts, the astonishing success of the newly founded party suggested the French wanting to give their new president, who calls himself “neither left nor right,” a chance.


BBC -
Macron's party set for parliamentary majority, polls show

French President Emmanuel Macron's party is on track for a parliamentary majority, exit polls suggest, weeks after his presidential victory.

Two polls projected La République en Marche (Republic on the Move or LREM) and MoDem combined winning 355-360 seats, but a third poll by Elabe awarded the two parties a bigger majority of between 373 and 403 seats. Correspondents say opponents of Mr Macron may simply have not bothered to turn out for the vote.


The Guardian -
Macron marches on as his party wins large majority in French parliament

The French president Emmanuel Macron’s new centrist movement has won a large majority in the French parliament, according to the first official results on Sunday night.

Macron’s fledgling “neither right nor left” political movement, La République en Marche (LREM), and its smaller centrist ally Democratic Movement (MoDem) needed 289 seats to have an absolute majority in parliament; according to initial exit polls they were on track to take around 355 seats in the 577-seat national assembly.


CBS News -
Partial results of French parliamentary vote show Macron's party leading

PARIS -- Partial official results from France's second-round parliamentary elections show President Emmanuel Macron's centrist party with a clear lead over the country's traditional right-wing and leftist parties.

With 57 percent of votes counted, the Interior Ministry said Sunday that Macron's Republic on the Move! party had won 41 percent of the vote, followed by the conservative Republicans with 23 percent.


New York Times -
French Parliamentary Elections: What to Watch For

French voters will go to the polls on Sunday for the second round of important parliamentary elections, one week after President Emmanuel Macron’s party dealt a blow to traditional establishment parties by gaining a commanding lead in the first round.

Under French law, parties that do not field at least 50 percent of female candidates in the legislative elections are fined, but parties have sometimes preferred to pay the fines or have fielded female candidates in districts that are hard to win.


The Guardian -
Macron and En Marche expect big win in French parliamentary elections

France has begun voting in parliamentary elections which are expected to hand Emmanuel Macron a landslide majority, a second triumph for him after his presidential victory and one which should allow him to embark on sweeping social and economic shakeups.

Just a month after the 39-year-old former banker became the youngest head of state in modern French history, pollsters forecast that his centrist La République En Marche (La REM) party will win as many as 75-80% of seats in the lower house of parliament on Sunday.


New York Times -
Election Success for Emmanuel Macron May Mask Real Challenges

Yet his party’s likely sweep of the legislative elections may disguise real challenges for Mr. Macron as well as for France, as the country tentatively journeys up a path of change it has long avoided.

The parliamentary candidates running under the banner of the newly elected president, Emmanuel Macron, appear poised to win a crushing electoral majority on Sunday that extends from France’s Alpine heights to the Brittany coast and from the Mediterranean to Paris.



“Four hostile newspapers are more to be feared than a thousand bayonets...” ― Napoléon Bonaparte