Display:

The case for restricting hate speech

Instead of characterizing racist and sexist hate speech as “just speech,” courts and legislatures need to account for this research and, perhaps, allow the restriction of hate speech as do all of the other economically advanced democracies in the world.

These negative physical and mental health outcomes — which embody the historical roots of race and gender oppression — mean that hate speech is not “just speech.”

35 Other Related Articles

LA Times -
Happy birthday, iPhone: Ten years later, Steve Jobs' creation owns us

Steve Jobs unveiled the first iPhone in January, 2007, before an adoring congregation, in his signature “Sermon on the Mount” style.

I watched the Jobs keynote introducing the iPhone, and — like many others — I was charmed by the device’s sleekness and aspirational price tag.


LA Times -
The U.S. government is still spying on Americans. Here are some fixes for that

Another way to protect Americans’ privacy would be for Congress to codify a recent decision by the NSA to no longer collect communications in which the email address of a foreign target appeared in the text of a message between Americans.

Because even though residents of this country aren’t the targets of Section 702’s elaborate electronic dragnet, their emails, phone calls and Internet chats can be caught up in it incidentally — for example, when a foreign ”target” is emailing or talking on the phone to an American living in the U.S.. Section 702 is the direct descendant of the warrantless electronic surveillance program instituted by the George W. Bush administration after Sept. 11, 2001, that caused a sensation when its existence was exposed by the New York Times in 2005.


LA Times -
When it comes to regulating marijuana, can we ever count on Los Angeles to do the right thing?

I felt kind of sorry for the guy sitting next to me Monday at the “Future of Cannabis” event at the Los Angeles Athletic Club.

Why is Los Angeles, one of the biggest marijuana markets, not the beacon on the hill for everyone else to be looking at?”. On Wednesday, the Los Angeles City Council will take a major step into the future when it votes to create a Cannabis Commission and a Cannabis Department.


LA Times -
Uber chief Travis Kalanick reportedly resigns

Travis Kalanick, chief executive of ride-hailing company Uber, reportedly resigned Tuesday, just a week into a leave of absence meant to quell concerns about his management style.

“I love Uber more than anything in the world and at this difficult moment in my personal life I have accepted the investors request to step aside so that Uber can go back to building rather than be distracted with another fight,” Kalanick said in a statement to the New York Times.


LA Times -
Report details death, panic in Ghost Ship warehouse fire

More than six months after the Dec. 2 blaze at the warehouse that authorities said was illegally converted into living quarters, the Oakland Fire Department has released a 50-page report filled with harrowing details of death and panic as the flames and smoke spread.

Many of the 36 people killed in the Ghost Ship warehouse fire in Oakland huddled together in the dark, and that's where they died of smoke inhalation.


LA Times -
Las Vegas hits 117 degrees, tying a record, as the Southwest bakes

Las Vegas hit 117 degrees late Tuesday afternoon, tying a record that has happened only three other times in the city’s history, the first in 1937 and the most recent four years ago.

For much of the afternoon, outdoor dining areas and patios along the Las Vegas Strip were empty as the hot sun pounded the streets and sidewalk relentlessly. Near the Linq Hotel & Casino, spray misters attached to tall posts outside gamely tried to combat the heat — though the water evaporated quickly.


LA Times -
It was 127 degrees in Death Valley, and miserable just about everywhere else. Here's how we coped.

At 7 a.m. in Death Valley, customers, short-order cooks and waitresses were already sweating inside the Wrangler Restaurant in Furnace Creek, where the air-conditioning system had broken down.

“We’ll be repairing broken mains all over this park for the next three months — it’s the nature of the beast in Death Valley.” “When it gets this hot, a lot of these pipes start busting open like 60-year-old clogged arteries,” said Andrew Becraft, 33, the park’s acting supervisor over roads and mechanics.


LA Times -
Las Vegas heat hits 117 degrees, tying a record, as Southwest bakes

Las Vegas hit 117 degrees late Tuesday afternoon, tying a record for heat that hasn’t been seen in four years and has happened only three other times in the city’s history.

Chad Martin, who was getting ready to leave Las Vegas to go home to Oklahoma on Southwest Airlines, said he kind of hoped his flight wouldn't take off until the record had either been tied or broken. The 42-year-old said he’d been playing blackjack in the outdoor pool area at the Flamingo hotel and casino before getting ready to head to the airport.


LA Times -
The DWP's biggest union is in line to get six raises by 2021

The agreement, backed by Garcetti and the DWP’s largest employee union, would provide raises of least 13.2% and as much as 22.3% by October 2021, depending on inflation.

Szabo said the pay agreement would reform the DWP by requiring that every union member undergo yearly performance evaluations. An audit released by City Controller Ron Galperin in 2015 found that officials at the institutes used their publicly financed credit cards to pay for travel, gasoline and other items without the proper policies and procedures to account for that spending.


LA Times -
Breakfast is canceled at a Death Valley restaurant — and other tales from the blazing desert

The temperature in Death Valley’s crumpled badlands was expected to reach 126 degrees by the afternoon, but things started to cook long before that at the Wrangler Restaurant in Furnace Creek on Tuesday.

“We can’t put customers through this -- it’s just too hot,” said John Kukreja, director of operations at the Oasis at Death Valley, formerly known as the Furnace Creek resort. Tuesday morning, however, staffers were trying to cool down by wrapping wet towels around their necks and guzzling ice water.


LA Times -
Twitch reaches 2-year streaming rights deal for Blizzard e-sports events

Video streaming service Twitch announced Tuesday a two-year deal with Blizzard Entertainment to become the exclusive third-party home for many of the Irvine game-maker’s e-sports events.

The global exclusivity deals a blow to Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, ESPN and other apps competing for streaming rights to the growing form of entertainment. Blizzard Entertainment parent Activision Blizzard Inc. was among early adopters of Facebook’s live-video feature, and it’s long used YouTube to spread its content.


LA Times -
Russian confidence in Putin remains strong, even as domestic problems persist

Despite concerns about such issues as rising food prices and tension with the West, many Russians support the direction the country is headed under President Vladimir Putin, according to a new poll.

Putin became prime minister in 1999 under President Boris Yeltsin and then was elected president in 2000, serving in the position until 2008, with term limits preventing a third consecutive term. Putin became prime minister again during Dmitry Medvedev’s presidency before being re-elected president in 2012.


LA Times -
Don't let Rep. Scalise's injury cow us into silence about the need for gun control and universal healthcare

As a necessary prelude to a necessary discussion, surely we all can agree that best wishes are due to the still-hospitalized House Majority Whip Steve Scalise (R-La.), who faces a difficult recovery from injuries suffered in the gun attack at a Republican baseball practice June 14.

In a country with a sensible and intelligent healthcare system, the treatment Scalise is receiving as a member of Congress would be equally accessible to any gunshot victim; for the moment it is, thanks to the Affordable Care Act, but Scalise advocates repealing that law.


LA Times -
Californians urged to reduce power as heat wave triggers statewide alert

With excessive heat forecast throughout the state Tuesday, operators of California’s electrical grid issued their first flex alert of the year and urged energy consumers to scale back power consumption over the next two days or risk outages.

A multi-state heat wave has brought stifling temperatures to such Southern California communities as Lancaster, Palmdale and Big Bear, where temperatures reached 110, 108 and 89 degrees respectively on Monday.


LA Times -
Each day nearly 20 kids are shot in America. You'd think we'd do something about that

In fact, 85% of children under age 12 were shot in a house or an apartment (60% of them overall by someone playing with a gun), but that drops to 39% among older kids, with a similar percentage shot in a street or alley.

In fact, according to a new analysis of federal data published in the academic journal Pediatrics, gun violence is the third leading cause of death for American kids between ages 1 and 17, and the second leading cause of injury-related deaths after motor vehicle accidents.


LA Times -
Rep. Scalise's injury is a teachable moment — about the need for gun control and universal healthcare

As a necessary prelude to a necessary discussion, surely we all can agree that best wishes are due to the still-hospitalized House Majority Whip Steve Scalise (R-La.), who faces a difficult recovery from injuries suffered in the gun attack at a Republican baseball practice June 14.

In a country with a sensible and intelligent healthcare system, the treatment Scalise is receiving as a member of Congress would be equally accessible to any gunshot victim; for the moment it is, thanks to the Affordable Care Act, but Scalise advocates repealing that law.


LA Times -
'It’s just too hot': Death Valley cafe loses air conditioning as temperature soars

By 7 a.m., on the first day of summer, customers, short-order cooks and waitresses were already sweating it out inside the cafe because the air conditioning system had abruptly broken down.

“We can’t put customers through this -- it’s just too hot,” said John Kukreja, director of operations at the Oasis at Death Valley, formerly known as the Furnace Creek resort. Tuesday morning, however, staffers were trying to cool down by wrapping wet towels around their necks and guzzling ice water.


LA Times -
Stocks falter as oil prices slump

The price of oil slumped Tuesday to its lowest level of the year and helped to restrain U.S. stock indexes, which were at record highs the day before.

Drillers have gotten much more efficient at pulling oil out of the ground, which has helped supplies to balloon and push down prices. Oil-producing countries have banded together to cut production in hopes of limiting supplies, but analysts are skeptical about how much they can influence prices.


LA Times -
Amazon and Whole Foods could revolutionize grocery delivery. But do shoppers want it?

If shoppers begin to embrace grocery delivery on a wider scale, that share will increase significantly given the size of the $800-billion grocery industry.

Amazon hopes to solve this problem with its acquisition of Whole Foods, which augments the Seattle company’s vast network of fulfillment centers with the grocers’ warehouses and 460 stores worldwide. That reduces the time that shoppers have to wait for food to appear on their doorsteps, and the distance that Amazon must travel to transport each order.


LA Times -
At what point does politics-as-usual become unconstitutional?

In its opinion striking down the Wisconsin map, the lower court invoked the 1st Amendment and the 14th Amendment’s equal protection formula in defining an unconstitutional partisan gerrymander.

The practice of drawing district lines in a way that gives one political party disproportionate power in Congress or a state legislature — is a time-dishonored practice in American politics.


LA Times -
Carrie Fisher opened up about her demons — and knew it wouldn't have a Hollywood ending

Carrie Fisher lived in rarefied circles — the daughter of Debbie Reynolds and Eddie Fisher, the actress best known as Princess Leia in the blockbuster “Star Wars” franchise.

HBO released a documentary about her relationship with her mother, “Bright Lights: Starring Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds.”


LA Times -
Trump's answer to the obesity epidemic: Here, have a cookie

The food-labeling requirements were announced last year as part of the Obama administration’s efforts to address America’s obesity epidemic.

The most important news was a largely overlooked announcement from the Trump administration that it’s bowing to the wishes of food companies — and ignoring the pleas of scientific and medical experts — by giving industry players more time to push sugary treats on an increasingly blubbery nation.


LA Times -
It's not the government's job to say if 'Slants' is too offensive. Or 'Redskins'

We don’t want the government deciding what brands and slogans are too offensive to be trademarked any more than we want the government deciding which shows are too disrespectful to be televised or which political treatises are too radical to be published.

“If the federal registration of a trademark makes the mark government speech, the federal government is babbling prodigiously and incoherently,” Alito wrote.


Global News -
At almost 48 degrees Celsius, Phoenix could see the hottest heat it’s had in 2 decades

Airlines canceled flights in Phoenix and doctors urged people to be careful around concrete, playground equipment and vehicle interiors Monday as a punishing heat wave threatens to bring temperatures approaching 120 degrees (48.9 degrees Celsius) to parts of the Southwestern U.S.. Arizona is seeing the most stifling temperatures, but the wrath of the heat wave is being felt across Nevada and California as well.


NBC News -
Too hot to handle: Dangerous heat to blanket Southwest U.S.

Dangerously hot temperatures were again forecast for California and the desert Southwest on Tuesday, where records could fall in a heat wave that the National Weather Service described as "extreme even by desert standards."

"It takes a lot for the weather service to put out excessive heat warnings for that part of the country, so you know it's going to be pretty darned hot," said Ari Sarsalari, a meteorologist for The Weather Channel.


New York Times -
Portugal Fire Survivors Recount Confusion Amid a Search for Escape

At first, they got in their car and tried to escape the advancing flames that swept across a vast, dry forest in central Portugal over the weekend.

On Monday, crews were still struggling to tame the deadly blaze in central Portugal, even as more than 2,000 firefighters battled separate fires around the country amid strong winds and scorching temperatures. Given those circumstances and the country’s history, some were already beginning to question why Portugal had not done more sooner to improve its land practices and fire-warning systems, and whether the authorities did enough to inform people trying to escape the blaze.


LA Times -
Immigration activist who says she was victim of retaliation by Border Patrol applies for 'Dreamer' protections

An immigrant rights activist who has said she was detained by Border Patrol agents in retaliation for protesting the arrest of her mother spoke out publicly for the first time Monday, announcing she will apply for protections as a “Dreamer” in the hopes of avoiding deportation. Claudia Rueda, 22, grew emotional as she stood in front of a detention center in downtown Los Angeles, describing her time in federal custody as a “nightmare.”


Wall Street Jurnal -
Amazon’s Whole Foods deal makes online grocery ‘prime’ for acceleration

Whole Foods adds about 430 bricks-and-mortar locations to Amazon’s arsenal, which can serve as distribution centers and pickup sites for online orders.

Should help speed along the adoption of online grocery, an area that has been slow to catch on with consumers, experts say. Heretofore, shoppers have been reluctant to have their perishables like meat, vegetables and dairy delivered to their homes.


Fox News -
Northeast braces for severe storms as Southwest to be hit with heat wave

On the opposite side of the country, the Southwest is getting ready to feel the wrath of a punishing heat wave includes a forecast of 120 degrees in Phoenix — a temperature not seen in the desert city in more than 20 years, The Associated Press reported.

In 1990, amid a similar heat wave, flights were cancelled at the Phoenix airport because there was too much uncertainty about how the heat would affect aviation performance.


LA Times -
Carrie Fisher's autopsy reveals cocktail of drugs, including cocaine, opiates and ecstasy

Fisher’s toxicology review found evidence of cocaine, MDMA (better known as ecstasy), alcohol and opiates when she was rushed to Ronald Reagan UCLA Hospital on Dec. 23, a toxicology report showed.

A Los Angeles County coroner’s report released on Monday revealed a mixture of drugs that were in actress Carrie Fisher’s system when she went into cardiac arrest on an L.A.-bound flight and later died.


NBC News -
Even cities used to dealing with 110 degrees are concerned over this heat wave

The southwestern U.S. is about to feel the wrath of a punishing heat wave that includes a forecast of 120 degrees in Phoenix — a temperature not seen in the desert city in more than 20 years.

Wunderground Weather Historian Christopher C. Burt said Phoenix temperatures rose to 120 degrees and above only three times in recorded history — twice in 1990 and once in 1995.


BBC -
Portugal forest fire: 12 survive by hiding in a water tank

Twelve people survived one of Portugal's deadliest fires by seeking refuge in a water tank after access to their village was cut off by the blaze.

Maria do Céu Silva has been hailed as a hero after using her house's water tank to rescue the residents of Nodeirinho, next to the IC8 motorway, which was badly hit by the fire. "My husband told me to put her in the van but she couldn't get in by herself so she told me: 'Let me die on the floor'," she told Correio da Manhã newspaper.


The Guardian -
Portuguese wildfires: government declares three days of mourning

The government has declared three days of national mourning as it awaits the arrival of more water-dropping planes from Spain, France and Italy.

António Guterres, the former Portuguese prime minister who is now the UN secretary general, said he was shocked and horrified by the fires. Portugal’s prime minister, António Costa, said the death toll was likely to rise as the emergency services conducted village-to-village searches, adding: “The fire has reached a level of human tragedy that we have never seen before.”


BBC -
Portugal forest fires: Three days of mourning for 62 victims

Emergency service workers were battling 156 fires across the country on Sunday, Prime Minister Costa said, adding that most of the victims had died in just one of them.

Four children are among the victims, many of whom were found dead inside their cars as they tried to flee the central forested region of Pedrógão Grande. Prime Minister Antonio Costa called it "the greatest tragedy we have seen in recent years in terms of forest fires".


New York Times -
Forest Fire in Portugal Kills at Least 57, Including Drivers Trapped in Cars

A raging forest fire in central Portugal destroyed several homes and left at least 57 people dead, many of whom were trapped in their cars while driving in the area, the Portuguese government said on Sunday.

Jorge Gomes, the secretary of state for internal administration, said at least 22 people had died in their cars, trapped by the flames while driving along a road between Figueiró dos Vinhos and Castanheira de Pera through the densely forested area where the fire started.



“Four hostile newspapers are more to be feared than a thousand bayonets...” ― Napoléon Bonaparte